Neurological Services

Our Lady of the Angels Hospital provides the following neurological testing services:

  • EEG (electroencephalogram) - a test that measures and records the electrical activity of the brain.
  • EMG (electromyogram) - a test that measures the electrical impulses of muscles at rest and during contraction.
  • Nerve Conduction Study - a test that measure show well and how fast the nerves can send electrical signals.

EEG

What is an EEG?

EEG is an abbreviation for electroencephalogram. EEGs record and measure the electrical activity of the brain.

How are EEGs Performed?

During this neurological exam, electrodes are attached to the patient's head and hooked by wires to a computer. The computer records the brain's electrical activity on the screen.

You may be asked to quit taking certain medications the day before the test. In addition, you should not consume food or drink containing caffeine at least eight hours before the test. Because electrodes will be attached to your scalp, it is important your hair be clean and free of sprays, oils, creams, and lotions. Shampoo your hair and rinse with clear water the evening before or the morning of the test. Do not put any conditioner or oil on after shampooing.

EMG

What is EMG?

EMG, or Electromyography, is a study used to evaluate weakness, numbness, pain and symptoms such as fatigue, cramps or abnormal sensation. It measures muscle and nerve function. This test takes 30 to 60 minutes.

Let the Technologist know:

  • If you are taking blood thinning medication, such as aspirin, Plavix or Coumadin.
  • If you have a pacemaker.
  • If you are taking Myasthenia medication, you will be asked to stop taking it prior to your test.

Before Your Test

Shower or bathe before your test. Do not apply lotion or oils on your skin after you bathe, prior to your test. You may wear deodorant. Wear loose comfortable clothes.

During Your Test

You will lie on an exam table, and you may be asked to put on a gown.

The doctor will clean the area with alcohol. A fine needle will be inserted into the selected muscle. No injection or stimulation is given through the needle. You will be asked to relax. The doctor will determine if the muscle is working normally by evaluating the activity seen and heard.

Nerve Conduction Study

What is a Nerve Conduction Study?

A Nerve Conduction Study, or NCS, is a study used to evaluate weakness, numbness, pain and symptoms such as fatigue, cramps or abnormal sensation. It measures muscle and nerve function. This test takes 30 to 60 minutes.

Let the Technologist know:

  • If you are taking blood thinning medication, such as aspirin, Plavix or Coumadin.
  • If you have a pacemaker.
  • If you are taking Myasthenia medication, you will be asked to stop taking it prior to your test.

Before Your Test

Prior to your test, shower or bathe as normal. Do not apply lotion or oils on your skin after you bathe, prior to your test. You may wear deodorant. Wear loose comfortable clothes.

During Your Test

You will lie on an exam table, and you may be asked to put on a gown.

Electrodes will be attached to your skin and a mild electrical stimulation will be given to stimulate a portion of the nerve. This response will be recorded so that the doctor can evaluate and determine if the nerve impulse is:

  • Conducting normally
  • Conducting slowly
  • Not transmitting at all, suggesting nerve damage.

After Your Test

All electrodes will be removed. You will be able to resume all normal activity for the day. Your doctor will inform you of the results of the exam.